Sydney, Australia flyover in Apple Maps

Last night I did a clean install of my Mac and today I opened Apple Maps for the first time in this Mac. It asked my permission to use my location and when I said yes, it identified I was in Sydney and I saw a little button to 'Start Flyover'. I don't remember seeing that before, so I clicked yes.

Wow, I sure do live in a beautiful city.

Watching this 90 second or so flyover made me smile. I liked it so much that I decided to make a video and share it. So there you go, this is Sydney, Australia.

Dave Trott on making fear your friend

Dave Trott on making fear your friend:

Why did Steve Jobs think he had to avert a crisis?

Well precisely because things were looking good.

The previous day, Steve Jobs had seen the new Nokia mobile phone.

No big deal, just another mobile phone: It had the usual range of trivial features.

One of the gimmicks was you could download six tunes onto it.

Not very useful, no one cared.

But something at the back of Steve’s mind nagged away at him.

And he woke up in the middle of the night thinking “If they can download six tunes what happens if they can download sixty tunes? Or six hundred tunes? That’s the end of the iPod – that’s fifty percent of our business gone – It’ll be too late to worry then, we won’t have a company.”

It's a great example and hopfully it'll tempt you to go read the whole thing. I'm a fan of Dave Trott.

Week 26: Aperture Workflow eBook, Timelapse photography, and Essentialism

Effective Aperture Workflow Book Updated

If you use Apple's Aperture you need to get this book. It's written by Scott Davenport, an active member of the Aperture community and a great landscape photographer.

 
 

I purchased Effective Aperture Workflow many months ago and enjoyed it immensely, but more importantly, I learned a lot from it. Scott goes through his workflow in a lot of detail and believe me, it's a good workflow. I've adapted many things from the book into my own.

The book is available in the iBookstore and includes a bunch of video where Scott shows you as he explains. It's only $6.99.

Last week Scott updated it with new content and I'm going through it again.

The Art Of The Timelapse by Michael Shainblum

Not much to add to this other than... wow. See more from Michael Shainblum at his website and Vimeo channel.

Greg McKeown on Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less

I often fall for this. Sometimes I try to do way too many things and end up finishing none. Or the ones I finish are half-assed because I had to split my time and attention on too many non-essential things. The worst is, as Greg McKeown explains in the video below, when you do something that's successful and that opens a lot of new doors and you try to go through all of them. Success can bring failure indeed.

The video is about Greg's latest book titled Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less (Amazon | iBookstore | unfortunately I couldn't find in Audible). I just purchased it and it's next on my reading list.

Week 13: Nikon Df, OmniFocus 2, and Flo Fox

Photographer Mick Rock on the Nikon Df

When the Nikon Df was first announced I was really excited. Then I saw the photographs and my excitement quickly turned into disappointment. The camera looked like they had just bolted on analog-looking knobs and dials on top of a modern body. At least in the pictures, it looks hideous. The specs are a weird choice as well, but the price is what really killed it for me. It's just plain ridiculous.

I had completely ignored the Df since then, but today, Rob Boyer wrote an article in which he shares his impressions after having held one. It seems it's not as bad as it looks in pictures, but that's about it. 

Rob also shared the Nikon sponsored video below where Mick Rock, an acclaimed rock music photographer, shares his thoughts on the Df.

I like the video and his philosophy about photography. I found particularly funny that they bleeped when he said bastard, in the following quote:

I know when I've got the shot. Do I know the exact frame? Sometimes I'm moving too fast to be that sure. But I know what it smells like when you've nailed the bastard.

I love that quote. I ended up spending some time going through his work. Good stuff.

OmniFocus 2 for Mac is back

OmniFocus 2 has been redesigned, a new beta is available for download (if you registered way back when), and it's scheduled to ship in June. This is great news. You can read about it at the Omni site. I just downloaded it and will be playing with it over the weekend. First impression is that it looks much better than the previous beta, but still too... plain. I have to use it to get a real feel for it, but it does look a bit boring.

Flo Fox by Riley Hooper

Two videos in the same weekly roundup? Yep. I can't not share this one. Truly inspirational. What a woman. If I ever complain again about something petty please somebody whack me in the head. Just watch it now.

Learn more about Flo Fox at her website. Then read this article on NYMag. Then go out and create something.

Week 11: All about photography

This week has been hectic. I wanted to post the weekly roundup on Friday as I regularly do, but just didn't get to it. But, better late than never, so here it is. This time it's all about photography

Beauty Recovery Room by Ji Yeo

I came across the work of Ji Yeo through an article in Wired. I was particularly attracted to her series titled Beauty Recovery Room, which is the topic of the article.

This is how she explains it in her statement:

Beauty Recovery Room series uses the wounded faces and bodies of women who have recently undergone plastic surgery to show the physical cost of adhering to social pressure in Korea. Plastic surgery has become an integral part of Korea’s current culture, often regarded as a integral step in the in self improvement process. Going under the knife, enduring bruises, scars, and being under general anesthetic several times are no longer considered risky or extravagant. They have all had multiple procedures and have plans for future augmentation. The photos were taken directly after their operation while they were resting and waiting to be healed.

Fascinating work. It is NSFW and some might find the images unsettling, so be mindful of that before you go check them out.

/Body/Parts/ by Ino Zeljak

Another interesting project with a clever idea. /Body/Parts/ shows, as its name suggests, only parts of people's bodies on a table. I think I just made it sound gruesome. It's not. It's actually beautiful work and I clearly can't explain it intelligently, so just click on the link and enjoy.

Five things for every creative person by Chase Jarvis

Back in 2012 I read this post by Chase Jarvis titled Your New Hit List: 5 Things That Every Creative Person Should Get (and Give) and I saved it in OmniFocus with a reminder to read it every 6 months (I have a few of those). It popped up this week and I thought I'd share it here.

Week 6: Love, pockets, and Evernote

Find what you love and let it kill you

This week I read an article by pianist James Rhodes in the Guardian titled "Find what you love and let it kill you". It's beautiful and there's really nothing I could quote here without taking away from the piece. Please go read it now. It's worth it.

I've become a fan of Rhodes and just purchased one of his albums in iTunes. Amazing music and he's the type of artist I love supporting.

Via: Steven Pressfield.

Jerry Seinfeld on creating a show today

Jerry Seinfield:

Why would I put a show on a big heavy rectangle in your house when I could put it in your pocket.

This guy is brilliant.

Evernote adds descriptive search

From their announcement:

Imagine walking up to a bookshelf in your home. If you know where your desired book is, you see it and grab it. If you don’t know where the book sits, then you’ll try to recall the color of its spine, neighboring books, chronological placement, or any number of other attributes of the book until you find what you need.

Evernote’s search has always been great at providing the first part. If you know what you’re looking for, type in some keywords and the notes appear. Today, as part of our drive to create great experiences for users with a lot of notes, we’re introducing a new approach called Descriptive Search, which will let you find those notes, even if your memory of them is fuzzy and contextual.

This is great news and it works well if you use tags extensively. Unfortunately, it's not smart enough to look in the titles of notes. For example, I have a notebook in Evernote titled "Blog Post Ideas" where I create a note for each idea for an article I may want to write at some point. To keep them organised, I start the title with a related keyword. For example, articles about Aperture start with "APERTURE: Bla, bla, bla". I know I should use tags for this, but it's easier and faster for me to just start the title with a keyword.

Today I tried to search for "blog post ideas about aperture" and I didn't get what I expected. The search was for notes in "Blog Post Ideas" but that were tagged with "aperture". Since none of those are tagged it didn't give me any meaningful results.

I guess I should start using tags a lot more. There's a whole chapter on tags in Evernote Essentials that I just might read again over the weekend.

Anyone can fight the battles of just one day. It is only when you and I add the battles of those two awful eternities, yesterday and tomorrow, that we break down. It is not the experience of today that drives us mad. It is the remorse or bitterness for something that happened yesterday or the dread of what tomorrow may bring. Let us therefore do our best to live but one day at a time
— Richard Walker in Twenty-Four Hours A Day