Week 9: Printing, Dropbox and Task Management

To print or not to print

Greg Needham wrote a great article titled Print More over on Medium where he explains why he committed to printing more of his photographs in 2014. He says:

When we view photographs on the web, there’s always another photo right below the one we are looking at. Or there is a thumbnail gallery to the right, beckoning you to come click, see another, move on through the line. Consuming is fast and quick.

This is painfully true. The way I perceive a photograph in a book or a print in my hand is so different than looking at it online.

I recently noticed this while searching for John Loengard's work. I own a beautiful book of his called Pictures Under Discussion that I was reading a few weeks ago. After a while, I jumped online to see if I could find more of his photographs and I quickly noticed that while reading the book I stopped at every photograph for several minutes. I took it all in. I read the accompanying story. I immersed myself in his work. But online each picture got no more than a few seconds of my attention.

I'm going to join Greg and print more of my photographs this year. I want to create a few books as well.

Dropbox Terms of Service changes

Dropbox announced a change in their TOS last week. I'm not a lawyer and honestly don't understand exactly what it means to me. And since I'm in Australia it's even more confusing. I find these things extremely boring but people who's opinion I value have made negative comments about this change.

Here's how Sam Glover at The Lawyerist explains it in simple terms (in the comments):

Unless you opt out, you cannot sue Dropbox in court. Instead, you have to go to arbitration. Arbitration on its own is not necessarily horrible. But forcing every dispute into arbitration, where the arbitrators are mostly paid by the corporation, is generally regarded as anti-consumer.

Forcing you to waive class actions means that consumers will have no recourse as a group against Dropbox. Dropbox obviously likes this because, given the relatively low fees it charges, individual actions are not likely to be financially viable. Class actions are probably the only way consumers would be able to go after Dropbox.

You'll have to make your own mind about what it means to you, but if you want to opt out of the arbitration process you can do so here.

The Beginners Guide to Task Management

Very good article by Michael Hyatt on task management. I use a combination of OmniFocus and Evernote for this, whereas Michael uses Nozbe. But the principles he explains are applicable no matter what software you use.

Speaking of task management software, I've used OmniFocus for years and it's worked well for me. But I'm not sure what happened with version 2. A beta version was shown over a year ago when they did an event during Macworld but they put it on hold or changed direction shortly after that. I don't know what's going on and this article from Michael has me looking at Nozbe. It looks good so far. I've created a free account (up to 5 projects) to test it out.