Day of the Dead

Day of the Dead 2015

The Day of the Dead, or Día de Muertos, is one of many Mexican traditions that has captured the imagination of people all over the globe. It's even inscribed in the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity by UNESCO.

It's hard to explain if you're not Mexican and haven’t grown up with it.

Many years ago, while at university in Mexico, I took a contemporary art class with a French lecturer. She was really nice and knew her stuff. The class was interesting and engaging and I remember enjoying attending, which didn’t happen often. She'd only been in Mexico for a few months when the Day of the Dead came and I'm not sure what she expected. Surely she’d read about it and seen the beautiful, if eerie, imagery that’s associated with the celebration.

But she clearly wasn’t ready for what happened. Several of my classmates brought her a small skull made of sugar with her name written in the forehead.

This is not only common, but it’s in fact a very nice gesture. Kids love them. It’s basically a huge block of sugar with some more sugary stuff to decorate it. We think it’s funny.

She didn’t think it was funny at all.

She panicked. The next class she didn’t show up. We waited for a while and then all went on our ways. On the following week the head of the department came to the class to explain what had happened. She didn’t understand the skulls and thought we all hated her and wanted her dead! She was so disturbed by it that she decided to quit.

As I said, it’s difficult to explain.

Anyway, I love the short film above and thought it’d be a good time to share it. Enjoy. I hope.